The Second World War in Northern Ireland

The Second World War in Northern Ireland

Information Other Part 3

Bible Issued To U.S. Personnel

The Bible shown here was given to a local girl by James Lanham of headquarters Company, 202nd Engineer Combat Battalion, U.S. Army.

Another Bible

Shown here is "Our Salvation Bible" "King James Version" "Special Limited edition" With Copyright dated 1942 the Name appears to be Julius but the Surname is difficult to read.

The address seems to be 60 Lambs Square which may be at Beaufort, Rhyd Y Blewnear the Brecon Beacons in South Wales.

(Thanks very much to Judith Quee Halliday for this)

Death Sentence for United States Personnel

Following the arrival of American Military Forces in Northern Ireland the “Northern Ireland Disciplinary Barracks” were activated on 21st August 1942 at Holywood under the command of Captain Donald L. DeMuth who was formerly the Commanding Officer of the 234th Military Police Company.


A Disciplinary Training Centre was subsequently required in Britain and in Autumn of 1942 300 American prisoners arrived at Shepton Mallet Prison which was now known as 2912th Disciplinary Training Centre by the Americans.


Here are two cases relating to Northern Ireland.


Private Wiley Harris Jr.

On 6th March 1944 Harris had been drinking in The Diamond Bar in the North Queen Street area of Belfast.

He was approached by a man called Harry Coogan who asked him if he wanted a woman. Wiley said “yes” and Coogan pointed to a girl named Eileen Megaw and said if you want her I’ll get her.

A price of £1 in coins was agreed and Coogan led the pair to an Air Raid Shelter in Earl Street saying he would wait outside in case police arrived.

Harris went into the Shelter and placed his overcoat on the floor but at a subsequent General Court-Martial Harris said “Before I could do what I intended to do Coogan shouted the Police were coming. On going outside I could see no one about so I asked the girl to go to the shelter with me. She said no, so I asked for my money back but this was refused.

The court heard how the girl started to run dropping the coins and when Harris started to collect them Coogan hit him in the face. Harris then pulled out a knife and stabbed Coogan 17 times.

Harris, who was described as a Negro, was found guilty of murder and hanged at Shepton Mallet on 26th May 1944.


Private William Harrison

Serving with the 2nd Combat Crew Replacement Centre Group, United States Air Force, he had become friendly with the Wylie family from Killycolpy near Stewartstown, County Tyrone.

On 25th September 1944, when visiting their home, Harrison asked if he could take their 7 ½ year old daughter, Patricia, to the local shop to buy a gift for Mr Wylie.

They never reached the shop.

Harrison took the little girl to a nearby field where he sexually assaulted and strangled her.


The General Court-Martial found Harrison guilty of rape and murder and he was executed at Shepton Mallet on 7th April 1945.


(These 2 cases have been taken from the book “Shepton Mallet Prison-380 years of prison regimes” by Francis Disney BEM.)

Taking Possession of Buildings

This is the Notice you would receive if your Premises was taken by the Government. (From the Brownlow Collection)

Northern Ireland Regiments - Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

The Article above was produced at the end of the Second World War by "The War Illustrated" Magazine. (The War Illustrated)

Northern Ireland Regiments - 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards

The Article above was produced at the end of the Second World War by "The War Illustrated" Magazine. (The War Illustrated)

Northern Ireland Regiments - The Irish Guards

The Article above was produced at the end of the Second World War by "The War Illustrated" Magazine. (The War Illustrated)

The Royal Ulster Rifles and Royal Irish Fusiliers

The Article above was produced at the end of the Second World War by "The War Illustrated" Magazine. (The War Illustrated)

Artwork by American Servicemen showing Northern Ireland during WW2

"Billet at an Aerodrome - Somewhere in Northern Ireland" By John Depol.

(More can be seen at the University of Delaware Library)

All of the pictures above are available to EVERYONE at the "Fold 3" Website

Artistic View of Northern Ireland During WW2.

The arrival of American Troops in Northern Ireland in January 1942. The March from the Docks. 

The Guard arriving for Dinner. 

A Pertol Point

Wiring the Camp. 

The four pictures shown above are by Edward Jeffrey Irving Ardizzone in 1942 and are part of the Imperial War Museum Collection.

(For more details visit http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search)

American Artwork

This first painting is called "Camp in Northern Ireland" by Harrison Standley. 

Here we have "An old Irish Courtyard" by Manuel Bromberg and dated 1943.

With the Republic of Ireland being Neutral during WW2 this would have been in Northern Ireland where a considerable number of large houses were used as Camps by the U.S. Military.

This is "Hall in Northern Ireland" by Harrison Standley dated 1944. 

I have a number of Halls included in this website which were used during WW2.

"Motor Pool at Northern Ireland" by Harrison Standley. - As above it could be one of a number of locations, many of which are included in this website.

(Visit http://www.history.army.mil/topics/ethnic/irish/Irish.htm for more details)

American Items at Chapel Hill, Tynan.

This American Entrenching Tool, Pick Axe (Both with "U.S." stamped on them) along with the fork were shown to me by a very helpful Couple at the Chapel Hill Camp site - Thank-you for your assistance.

Nelson's Boats, Donaghadee

The boat "The Brothers" operated from Donaghadee by  Nelson's Boats was built in 1935 and during the Second World War was taken over by the Admiralty.

It was armed with a gun fitted to the front and was used as both a Service Launch and Motor Gun Boat to patrol Carlingford Lough.

Belgian Forces in Northern Ireland.

This "Belgian Forces in United Kingdom" Flag is on display in the Merville Gun Battery in Normandy, France.

This medal was presented to the Northern Ireland War Memorial Museum by the 2nd Infantry Brigade “YSER”.

All members of the Brigade were presented with the medal for their time in Northern Ireland between 1944 and 1946.

(Thanks to N.I.W.M. for the pictures which are Copyright of the Northern Ireland War Memorial)

Insignia of 6th Infantry Brigade, Belgian Army

These photographs show the Insignia worn by Belgian Army in Northern Ireland in 1945.
On the left is the collar insignia of a Lieutenant
Directly above is a cap badge as worn on a general service cap
The badges above left are as follows :-

Title "Belgium" and Belgian flag as worn on the upper sleeve
Crown and number 6 as worn on shoulder (6th Brigade)
Crossed rifles and number 3 as worn on shoulder (3rd Battalion)

(Thanks very much to Hugo Cox for providing these photographs.)

Belgian Army veterans from 4th Brigade of Grenadiers under the Command of Colonel Georges-Camille Louppe returned to Northern Ireland in 1969.

The picture above shows Mr Louppe presenting Mr Honeyford from Banbridge Council with a glass Regimental Vase "As proof of the ties of Friendship which unite the inhabitants of Banbridge with the Members of our Brigade."

Between 1944 - 1945 there were about 4000 Belgian soldiers based in the Banbridge Area!

70th Anniversary of V.E (Victory in Europe) Day, Belfast.

Deputy Mayor of Belfast lighting Beacon.

Coca-Cola During WW2

Here are some illustrations of how the Coca-Cola Company incorporated WW2 and the presence of U.S. Personnel in the British Isles into their Advertising.

“A hundred thousand welcomes” says the kindly Irishman when he meets a stranger. And it’s got the same heart warming friendliness as an Irish “Top o the morning”

The American soldier says it in another way “Have a Coke” says he and in three words he has said Greetings Pal.

It’s a phrase that works as well in Belfast as in Boston …..

Coca-Cola embracing the American stereotype of Ireland even though it was only Northern Ireland which was at war with the Nazis whilst the 26 Counties of Eire remained Neutral (Although many Irishmen followed their conscience and fought with the British Armed Forces including the Royal Air Force, who it appears were also partial to a glass of Coca-Cola!

Here the advertising says “Have a Coke is a friendly greeting among R.A.F. Flyers back at early dawn from a night mission. It’s a salute among Comrades in Arms that seals the bonds of Friendship in Plymouth, England as in Plymouth Massachusetts.”

(For more information please visit http://envisioningtheamericandream.com )

War Hospital Supply Depot locations in Northern Ireland.

BELFAST MRS MACKENZIE, CHETWOOD, NOTTING HILL, MALONE ROAD

BELFAST MRS BALLARD, THE RED HOUSE CLUB, 100 HIGH STREET
BELFAST MRS C. A. WILKINS, 34 GLANTANE STREET, ANTRIM ROAD
NEWTOWNARDS MRS A. S. BLOW, COMMANDANT DOWN, 60 THE CROFT
BANBRIDGE MRS N. G. FERGUSON, CLONASLIE
ARMAGH MRS CROZIER, THE PLACE
BELFAST MRS R. J. MCCORDIE, CABIN HILL, KNOCK
STRABANE MISS B. A. CLARKE, MAGHEREAGH
LARNE MRS COUSINS, LARK HILL
MARKETHILL MRS AUCHMUTY, THE RECTORY
NEWTOWN HAMILTON MRS MCFERRAN
JERRETTS PASS LADY MURIEL CLOSE, DRUMBANAGHER
LARNE HARBOUR MRS MCCANN, 1 GOLF VIEW, BAY ROAD
TANDRAGEE MRS WHITE, ORANGE HILL
TYNAN MISS ROSE STRONGE, TYNAN ABBEY
LURGAN MISS E. GREER, 20 CHURCH PLACE
BALLYMENA MRS MORTON, TOWN HALL
NEWTOWNARDS MISS IVESTON, 10 FRANCIS STREET
RICHHILL MRS WILSON, HOCKLEY LODGE
LONDONDERRY MRS HAYES, THE DEANERY
BALLYMONEY MRS HAMILTON, ASHLEIGH
CRUMLIN MRS C. E. MCCLINTOCK, GLENDARAGH
LIMAVADY MRS MCCAUSLAND, DRENAGH
LISBURN MRS G. R. BELL, ST. JOHN'S AMBULANCE
RICHHILL MRS MAYSE, THE RECTORY, KILMORE
BALLYCASTLE MISS GLOVER
DUNGANNON MRS DARRAGH, THE VILLA
WHITEABBEY MRS BRADLEY, JORDANSTOWN RECTORY
BANBRIDGE MRS J. D. SMYTHE, MILLTOWN HOUSE
LONDONDERRY MRS STEVENSON, KNOCKAN
WARRENPOINT MRS HALL, NARROW WATER
FINTONA MRS WALKER
KILKEEL MRS FLOYD, BORCHA
KILKEEL MISS G. WARING, LIONACRES HOUSE
MILFORD MRS OSBORNE, KNOCKNAGEANE
LOUGHGALL MISS BATES, BEECHVILLE
BELFAST MISS A. JOHNSTONE, MUNICIPAL T. INSTITUTE
OMAGH MRS MACAFEE, THE MANSE
PORTADOWN MRS S. W. BLACKER, CARRICK BLACKER
TEMPLEPATRICK MRS WALLACE, LYE HILL MANSE
STRABANE MISS MCCREA, DERRY ROAD
BALLYMENA MRS WILSON, GRACEHILL
STRABANE MRS JAMES HILL, HAZELWOOD
LURGAN MRS A. W. MANN, WINDSOR BUILDINGS
PORTRUSH MISS H. COX, ARDEEVIN
ROSTREVOR MRS R. SINTON 
LONDONDERRY MRS WATT, THORN HILL
MOY LADY W. MACGEOUGH BOND
ARMAGH T. G. F. PATERSON, 4 MALL VIEW
LONDONDERRY MRS COCHRANE, SPRING HILL, QUIGLEY'S POINT
LONDONDERRY REV. ROBERT DUGGAN, B.A., THE RECTORY, CULMORE
MAGUIRESBRIDGE MRS ARMSTRONG, TODD HOLLY MOUNT

Belfast Children being Evacuated

(Belfast Telegraph Photograph)

Northern Ireland Tastes Victory!

The items above are from "The War Illustrated" Magazine (The War Illustrated)

Home From The War To A "Prefab"

Service Personnel returning to Northern Ireland after War Service were among those who were obliged to use Prefabricated Bungalow's for short term Housing.

The Bungalows were made of asbestos and for many the short term housing lasted considerably longer that would have been expected, Including my Mum and her Parents!!

Shown here are a row of Prefabs on Stranmillis Embankment and the same location today. (From Old Belfast Photographs and Google)